Tuesday, June 19, 2012

More quick campaign hits

1.  Politico:  Gary Johnson at 7% in Colorado (before his visit to a marijuana dispensary and marching in the pride parade yesterday), 9% in Arizona, and 12% in New Mexico.  Romney crapping a brick.

2.  We must be making progress.  Now HuffPo is telling Libertarians that they can be influential in American elections only if they register as independents, swing back and forth between the anointed Dems and GOPers, and forsake the idea of building their own party.

3.  Ron Paul:  Mitt may have the nomination, but he does not have the "hearts and minds" of the GOP rank and file.  Rand to be spanked behind house later.

4.  Progressives and libertarians agree that excessive government regulation is causing the affordable housing crisis in America?  Be still my heart.

5 comments:

Will McVay said...

HuffPo's got it half right. The swinging back and forth to CHALLENGE the party's anointed has a lot of potential, I think, and in the process may serve to build a party.

anonone said...

Currently the U.S. has two major parties: a far-right conservative party and a conservative party. Libertarians only give the country another right-wing conservative party.

NCSDad said...

Libertarians = right wing conservative? I'd laugh if that were not so sad. Have you not been reading Steve's posts before you comment?

anonone said...

@NCSDad - Have you read the Libertarian platform before you comment?

It is a virtual litany of conservative dreams.

Surprise yourself, and read it sometime.

Andrew R Groff said...

I find plenty of common ground with Libertarians and Progressives. Although I dislike dealing in dichotomies, I believe we have come to the point where our problems are so thoroughly transparent and the way forward abundantly clear that I expect many active voters can agree that the very foundation of our democracy is at risk. A simple review of the implications of the NDAA, Patriot Act, CISPA, et al can convince even the novice that something is rotten in the non-state of DC. We need completely new representation. And, please, less lawyers, as many believe the answer to problems lies in more law making.